The Chihuly Effect…Glass Garden, Spaceneedle

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Persian Ceiling

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Mille Fiori

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Ikebana and Float Boat

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Chandeliers

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Glasshouse

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Gardens

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The Chihuly Garden and Glass, a long term exhibition at the  Seattle Center since 2012 is an incredible homage to the lifelong works featured in over 200 museums worldwide.  More than 1 million visitors attended the Tower of David Museum to view his installations. In 2001, the Victoria and Albert Museum in London curated the exhibition Chihuly at the V&A. Chihuly’s lifelong fascination for glasshouses has grown into a series of exhibitions within botanical settings. His Garden Cycle began in 2001 at the Garfield Park Conservatory in Chicago. Other major exhibition venues include San Francisco’s de Young Museum,  the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts and  the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, near London.

Blowing glass for more than four decades, Dale Chihuly is regarded as the best-known driving force, transcending traditional forms and uses of glass as art since World War II.  Born to working class parents in Tacoma, Washington,(who never attended college) his interest and fascination with glass began at an early age, paving the path towards a B.A. in interior design from the University of Washington in 1965.  In 1967, he received his Master of Science in sculpture from the University of Wisconsin-Madison under the guidance of Harvey Littleton, a glass artist and educator.  In 1968, he received Master of Fine Arts from the Rhode Island School of Design on a Fulbright Fellowship in Venice. In 1969, he was hired to start a glass department in Rhode Island School of Design where he was able to artistically mold the glass and experiments with glassblowing, encouraging his students to create new designs and objects using molten glass. In 1971, he founded the Pilchuck Glass School near Stanwood, Washington with the help of John Hauberg and Anne Gould Hauberg. He loved to experiment with the use of glass in unique and unconventional ways.  In 1976, he encountered a career-altering incident, resulting in blindness of  his left eye. But he was not discouraged at this loss; instead his conviction of producing artistic designs through the use of glass was deepened.  In 1979, after he gained some respect among critics and audiences for his work, he suffered another blow to his career.  He dislocated his shoulder and was not able hold the glassblowing pipe, a technique which he mastered all his life. Traveling with a group of 30 glassblowers to some of the finest cities of the world and created assemblages of giant chandeliers for the canals of Venice.

Observing this collection absolutely catapulted the imagination towards a dreamlike state no words can possibly convey!  Topping my list for #mustseeSeattle  I am humbly amazed at such inspiring creativity.

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